Remarkable Forgotten Dreams

Water Garden

Dreams I can’t remember–
I wonder–were they nice?
When I wake I understand
They enhance like spice.
Who was busy through the night?
I can not recall.
Who then turned the morning on?
Who put color in the dawn?
That one did it all.


Text: Linked to dVerse Quadrille Monday. Mish hosts today with the prompt word “spice”.

Photo: “Water Garden” by the author taken at the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Author: Frank Hubeny

I enjoy walking, poetry and short prose as well as taking pictures with my phone.

62 thoughts on “Remarkable Forgotten Dreams”

    1. Even if in some way it is ourselves talking to ourselves or to each other perhaps collectively or communally there is some kind of agent since the reality is neither determined nor random (at least as far as I can see). What occurred to me is that not being individually aware of the dreams does not mean they have no impact on us. Thanks, Bjorn!

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    1. I have had lucid dreams, but I don’t know how to control the process of waking up while I am dreaming. I suspect most of my dreams are forgotten happening earlier in the evening rather than toward morning when I can remember the dreams more easily and know that I was dreaming. I think those earlier dreams are valuable as well.
      But the most valuable part of dreaming, for me, occurs when I wake up in the morning and understand something out of nowhere better than I had in the past or I have a better way of saying something than before. I don’t know where that comes from. It does not come from my own brain-heart-body, or my own individuality–at least I don’t think so. That was a nice video, Paul. Thanks for sharing it. Now I am going to have to try to perfect the techniques of lucid dreaming.

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    1. That is usually my case when I wake up in the morning. Most of the dreams I’ve forgotten, but I don’t think they are lost. I have had lucid dreams on occasion, but when I try to make sense out of them in the morning, they don’t make sense. Maybe I should practice the technique more. Thanks, Charley!

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  1. My best dreams of all are (or I should say were) flying dreams, in which I’d levitate and sail over the land below to my next stopping point. They were wonderful, but I don’t have them any more. I wonder why. Loved your poem, loved the last line!

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    1. I remember a few flying dreams but they are not common for me, at least among those I remember. The one I remember was lucid. I knew I was dreaming and could go where I wanted to go. I wanted to see the different sides of the building below. I’m glad you liked the poem, Bev!

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  2. I really liked this, Frank. Simple, but still speaks to the complexity of dreams. I can remember a dream I had as a child, but it was mixed with the sound of a table saw my father was making and our cocker spaniel who came home with him from Australia and WWII. But most dreams I have forgotten. But some haunt still. Lovely poem, Frank.

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    1. I suspect we don’t have to remember dreams for them to be beneficial for us, but I don’t know. There are negative dreams and even thoughts I wish I didn’t have, but they sometimes come back to awareness–so I think I experience something similar to what you describe. Thanks, Lillian!

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    1. I have a Samsung camera probably similar to what your iPhone can do. I think these phones are good for general photography and they fit easily in a pocket, but those with better cameras can get more interesting pictures of closeups and night scenes–and many things I haven’t thought of taking a picture of. Thanks, Jacqui!

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    1. Thank you, Victoria! I get ideas from all these poems. It is a win-win situation. That is a scene at the Chicago Botanic Garden. The garden is on multiple islands. I live close enough to bicycle there and the forest preserve is adjacent. The water is an interesting background to the garden.

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