My Outside Space

Picnic Table and Pond
Picnic Table and Pond

Dale offers the prompt “my outside space” for this week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge.

I took these photos a short walk from where we now live.

The leaves below are either from a sweetgum tree or a sycamore or something else entirely. The sunset in the bottom photo was taken from the other side of the pond shown in the top photo.

Sweetgum Leaves
Sunset Over Pond
Sunset Over Pond

Author: Frank Hubeny

I enjoy walking, poetry and short prose as well as taking pictures with my phone.

28 thoughts on “My Outside Space”

    1. A very famous Pantheism. The belief that reality is identical with divinity, or that all things compose an all-encompassing, immanent god or goddess. Pantheism was popularized in Western culture as a theology and philosophy based on the work of the 17th-century philosopher Baruch Spinoza, in particular, his book Ethics. Early traces of pantheist thought can be found within the theology of the ancient Greek religion of Orphism, where pan (the all) is made cognate with the creator God Phanes (symbolizing the universe), and with Zeus, after the swallowing of Early traces of pantheist thought can be found within the theology of the ancient Greek religion of Orphism, where pan (the all) is made cognate with the creator God Phanes (symbolizing the universe), and with Zeus, after the swallowing of Phanes.

      Also known as Protogonus. The mystic primeval deity of procreation and the generation of new life, who was introduced into Greek mythology by the Orphic tradition; other names for this Classical Greek Orphic concept included Ericapaeus or Erikepaios and Metis.

      Pantheism was formalized as a separate theology and philosophy based on the work of the 17th-century philosopher Baruch Spinoza. He developed highly controversial ideas regarding the authenticity of the Hebrew Bible and the nature of the Divine, and was effectively excluded from Jewish society at age 23, when the local synagogue issued a herem against him. Spinoza would father the late 19th Century Protestant Higher Criticism dud.

      In the posthumous Ethics, “Spinoza wrote the last indisputable Latin masterpiece, and one in which the refined conceptions of medieval philosophy are finally turned against themselves and destroyed entirely.” [Scruton 1986 (2002 ed.), ch. 1, p.32]. Spinoza opposed René Descartes’ famous mind–body dualism, the theory that the body and spirit are separate. He argued a monist view which held that the mind & body exist as an intact unit. A view that there is only one kind of ultimate substance; that reality exists as one unitary organic whole with no independent parts.

      Fichte’s 1794 Wissenschaftslehre as Spinozism on a Kantian foundation. [CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY (http://www.pensgard.com/phildocs/Pensgard_FOUNDATIONS%20OF%20FICHTES%201794%20WISSENSCHAFTSLEHRE%20A%20CRITICAL%20EXPOSITION%20OF%20HIS%20STARTING%20POINT.pdf )]

      Hegel’s History of Philosophy writes: concerning the opinion of Hegel, with a quote: “You are either a Spinozist or not a philosopher at all” and “It is therefore worthy of note that thought must begin by placing itself at the standpoint of Spinozism; to be a follower of Spinoza is the essential commencement of all Philosophy. For as we saw above, when man begins to philosophize, the soul must commence by bathinging in this ether of the One Substance in which all that man has held as true has disappeared.”

      Spinoza earned praise as one of the great rationalists of 17th-century philosophy. and one of Western philosophy’s most important thinkers. Although the term “pantheism” was not coined until after his death, he is regarded as the most celebrated advocate of the concept.
      Heinrich Heine, in his Concerning the History of Religion and Philosophy in Germany (1833–36), remarked that “I don’t remember now where I read that Herder once exploded peevishly at the constant preoccupation with Spinoza, “If Goethe would only for once pick up some other Latin book than Spinoza!” But this applies not only to Goethe; quite a number of his friends, who later became more or less well-known as poets, paid homage to pantheism in their youth, and this doctrine flourished actively in German art before it attained supremacy among us as a philosophic theory.”

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