Words

 
Words would try to touch the heart of it.
They vaguely churn weak hopes that that will do.
Doing so is but a part of it.

Experts draw and make a chart of it,
Push away what clearly won’t go through.
Words would try to touch the heart of it.

The sound of words, a pleasing start of it,
May tease with pleasure seeking what is true.
Doing so is but a part of it.

Fancy words entail what's smart in it
And fool us with a wave of wisdom, too.
Words would try to touch the heart of it.

Guilt appears like broken art in it,
Displays a glimpse of past for us to rue.
Doing so is but a part of it.

So, come, forgiveness, fill your cart with it.
Keep the future open to what’s new.
Words would try to touch the heart of it,
But love protects the deepest part of it.

A villanelle linked to Sarah’s Forms for All and dVerse Meeting the Bar where Grace is hosting with the theme of rhyme and slant rhyme.

Also linked to Debbie Roth’s Forgiving Fridays.

Sunrise Observation

Menu Filtered Reality

The menu doesn’t nourish like a meal,
But helps the heart decide on what to do.
Consider how true knowledge twists what’s real.

Words conceal whenever they reveal.
There’s always something more to struggle through.
The menu doesn’t nourish like a meal.

What’s fully true is more than we can feel
Though what we feel reveals that pure truth, too.
Our knowing turns and teases what is real.

Food may be a medicine that heals
Or poison that consumes us as we chew.
The menu doesn’t nourish like a meal.

The heart insists the brain submits and kneels
So it can help them both explore what’s new,
Obtain sure knowledge teasing what is real.

Impulsive day is eager for a deal.
May dreamy night’s correction shelter you.
The menu doesn’t nourish like a meal
Nor does true knowing circumscribe what’s real.


Linked to dVerse Meeting the Bar. I am hosting today and the form is a villanelle. You are welcome to link a villanelle you have written for this prompt.  The modification I made to the villanelle form is to not exactly repeat the second line of the couplet theme.
Photo: “Sweet Corn” by the author