The Acorn’s Wish

Tree

The acorn doesn’t worry much.
It wants to be a tree.
But if it feels a squirrel’s touch,
Then lucky squirrel. Its wish comes true
To run the way that squirrels do,
But on some other tree.

 


Linked to dVerse Poetics hosted by Mish with the prompt to write from nature’s point of view.

Author: frankhubeny

I enjoy walking, poetry and short prose as well as taking pictures with my phone.

54 thoughts on “The Acorn’s Wish”

      1. Frank, I found out just a couple weeks ago that the folks who study these things now calculate only one acorn a year — out of the thousands or tens of thousands produced — survives to become a mature oak.

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      2. Considering the quantity of acorns on oak trees I have seen the tens of thousands seems about right. The trees have to keep the squirrels alive so the seeds have a way to move far from the base of the parent tree. The acorn’s service is mainly as food.

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    1. I don’t think the acorn really worries much even though from our perspective it looks kind of sad, but not all those acorns are going to become trees and yet they have to be ready to if necessary. I liked the “aw nuts”. Thanks!

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  1. I suppose it’s better than being stepped on…crunch…but then perhaps being composted back to the earth isn’t so bad either. Oh the cycles of life!
    This was a fun read, Frank.

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    1. I think you are right about empathizing with a voice. We may also split the tree up into different parts and then treat them as individuals rather than as part of the larger tree such as the fate of an individual leaf or flower petal or seed from the tree. Good point and thank you for the comment!

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    1. One can’t take sides. I am also thinking that it is really the tree not the acorn that is the key and acorns are gifts from the tree to the squirrels and also a means to create another tree should that be necessary.

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  2. Squirrels and acorns are always interesting to watch … but I’ve always wondered how they remember where they hide the acorns. I wonder if they’re like us, and they rush to a corner of the yard, stop and say “Now why was it I came here?” Enjoyed the poem!

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    1. I can’t believe they make it through the winter, but then I’m assuming I would have to survive in the ways they do. I hope they have a few nutty experiences, so our species is not the only one.

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    1. That’s true. Just because the squirrel touches the acorn doesn’t mean it will eat it. Hiding it far away from the parent tree gives the acorn a chance to grow outside of the shade of that older tree. Now that I think about it the acorn more likely wants the squirrel to grab it. I guess this poem could use a major revision.

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      1. The fruit of an apple tree would want to be eaten so that the seeds inside can be deposited far from the parent tree by the animal when it digests the fruit but not the seeds. The tree benefits by having the seeds moved far away from it. Eating the fruit doesn’t kill the life, but allows it to survive. The many acorns that are eaten allow the very few that get lost the chance to grow into new trees. With all these comments I should be more worried about the squirrel than the acorn.

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    1. I should be more worried about the squirrel than the acorn especially given those Ice Age movies. I think the tree likes having squirrels scampering about it, moving its acorns as far away as possible.

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  3. What a wonderful batch of comments for your little gem. Probably seeds depend more on bird’s droppings than squirrel’s slobber from cheeks full of nuts–yet your poetic POV is fun & nice to frolic with them & you.

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    1. It is a good thing the comments came after posting the poem. Right now I’m not so worried about the acorn as I needed to be to write the poem in the first place. Thanks, Glenn!

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      1. I forgot about them also until Paul reminded me above. Another one of my original ideas turned out to be not as original as I thought. That acorn was driving that squirrel nuts.

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    1. I don’t think of acorns much either. I remember collecting some different kinds when I was a child but I couldn’t tell the difference between them anymore. After others mentioned the Ice Age movies I am more worried about that squirrel. Thank you!

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    1. A lot of individual dreams and potentials are not realized when other things happen. It is not the end but the means that count or do one’s best and not worry about the rest. Thank you for your comment.

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